If your state has not expanded Medicaid: You may qualify based on your state’s existing rules. These vary from state to state and may take into account income, household size, family status (like pregnancy or caring for young children), disability, age, and other factors. Because each state and each family situation is different, there’s no way to find out if you qualify without filling out an application.
Health insurance special enrollment periods typically last for 60 days after the date of your qualifying event. During this time, you can shop for health insurance on a private or public exchange. You’ll have the same plan options as you would during open enrollment, like copay plans, Health Savings Account (HSA)-compatible plans and a Young Adult plan. You may also have choices for dental plans and vision plans.
Lower-tier plans, such as Bronze and Catastrophic plans, have lower monthly premiums, but your total expenses will be much higher if you need medical care due to the high cost-sharing features. Therefore, these plans may be the best cheap option for young and healthy shoppers that have low expected medical needs and enough savings to cover the high deductibles, copays and coinsurance if necessary. But keep in mind that Catastrophic plans aren't available for everyone—you'll only qualify for these policies if you're under the age of 30 or meet certain exemptions.
Check with your state regulator that an agent has a valid license and a clean record, and make sure health insurance isn’t a sideline or a new specialty. You want an agent who represents a number of major insurers, rather than just one company. You also may want to ask agents how they’re compensated. Agents get commissions from insurers for each policy they sell, often calculated as a percentage of a customer’s premiums. These can range from around 3% to as high as 20%, according to agents and insurance officials. You want to know if your agent will make more money from selling you a certain plan. Also, commissions can be higher in the first year of a policy, an incentive for unscrupulous agents to “churn” clients, or try to get them to switch policies.
You may be eligible for a subsidy from the government to purchase an Affordable Care Act-compliant individual plan. This can help save you money on your health insurance. You may be eligible for a subsidy if your employer does not offer affordable health coverage and your household income is no more than 400% above the federal poverty level. You can see if you might qualify and review Medical Mutual subsidy-eligible plans here. 
You may want to consult the HHS Health Resources Services Administration (HRSA) directory of health centers at http://findahealthcenter.hrsa.gov/ - these health centers provide care on a sliding fee scale so it is affordable for anyone. You can receive care even if you are uninsured or cannot pay. Search the directory by zip code to find the centers nearest you.
Stay in network. Provider networks are groups of doctors, hospitals and other health care professionals that have agreed to work with your health plan. When you go to a provider who is not in your plan network, you'll have to pay a larger portion of the bill – or the entire bill. To find a provider in your network, register or log in to Blue Access for MembersSM, our secure member website, for a personalized search experience based on your health plan and network.
Although employers generally subsidize an employee’s job-based health insurance by paying a portion of the monthly premiums, the employer might not subsidize spousal or family coverage. If your spouse’s employer offers health insurance to his or her family members, your share of the premiums will be deducted from your spouse’s paycheck automatically.
You may have to wait until the next open enrollment period with your parent’s health plan to be added to your parent’s health insurance coverage. However, if you’ve recently lost other comprehensive health insurance coverage, you might be able to enroll even before open enrollment if you meet the health plan’s requirements for a special enrollment period.
Open Enrollment 2019 has already come to a close as of December 15, and Open Enrollment 2020 won’t start until November 1, but that doesn’t mean you can’t find cheap medical insurance right now! FirstQuote Health has put together a list of the cheapest medical insurance options that you can enroll in today. These plans will help you save money, while still giving you the peace of mind of being covered in the event of a medical emergency.

You can only qualify for Catastrophic health plans if you're under 30 years old or meet certain exemption requirements, although Bronze plans are available to anyone. These lower metal tier policies have cheap monthly premiums for health insurance, but much higher cost sharing. So, if you need medical care during the year, you would have to pay more money out of pocket before coverage kicks in. For instance, the Cigna Connect 7150 Bronze plan has a deductible of $7,350, whereas some Gold plans have a deductible below $1,000. If you can cover the high cost sharing in the event of an emergency and expect to have low medical costs, a Bronze plan may be your best cheap option for health insurance coverage.
AB339 – Signed into law in October 2015, this bill applies to all non-grandfathered individual and small group plans in California. It limits the copayment for a 30-day supply of any medication to no more than $250. It took effect January 1, 2017, and will last until January 1, 2020. For high-deductible health plans, the copay limit will apply after the deductible has been met (Covered California already implemented a similar restriction, starting in 2016).
In most cases, your coverage will take effect either the first of the next month, or the first of the month after that, depending on how late in the month you enroll. (Typically, if you enroll during the first 15 days of the month, your coverage will take effect on the first day of the next month. Enroll after the 15th and coverage won’t kick in until the first of the following month.)
A high-deductible health plan paired with a health savings account, or HSA, features a (as the name implies) high deductible before coverage begins. You can use money from the HSA for out-of-pocket medical expenses. Contributions you make to the account are tax deductible, and unused money rolls over to the next year. You get to keep the account even if you change health plans, and you can use the money for non-medical expenses in retirement.

Despite lower-than-average rates of uninsured residents, the one area where Ohio is lagging behind is in providing coverage on the individual market. There are a number of reasons for the small ranks of Ohioans who get their coverage on the individual market. First, many young adults don't need to seek their own health insurance, as the state recently bumped up the age for dependent coverage to 28, allowing many to receive coverage through their parents' plans. Moreover, the state's recent focus has been on ramping up assistance and mandates for small business health insurance, such as mandating that small businesses allow their workers to purchase health insurance with pre-tax dollars.


When shopping for health insurance, be sure that you pick a reputable Insurance company. Using a no-name insurance company may seem like an inexpensive alternative. However, if you have problems getting your claims paid when you need health coverage, it defeats the purpose of purchasing a health insurance policy. Health Plan One only offers plans with high quality health insurance carriers.
Now insurers have to cover you regardless of your health history, and they can't charge you more because of medical conditions. You qualify for health insurance even if you're pregnant, have a long-term condition like diabetes or a serious illness such as cancer. Health plans also can't cap the amount of benefits you receive, and they can't make you pay more than a certain amount out of pocket for health care each year. In addition, all individual health plans must cover a standard set of 10 benefits:

2 Telehealth providers participating in the Cigna Telehealth Connection program are independent contractors and separate from Plan network providers. Not all providers have video chat capabilities. Video chat is not available in all areas. PCP referral is not required. Refer to plan documents for a complete description of covered services, including other telehealth/telemedicine benefits. Program availability may vary by location and plan type. See vendor sites for details.
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