Your comment makes sense for fatFIRE types absolutely. However, my experience is that you can more routinely expect health issues to arise the older you (and your kids) get. I.e., don’t look back on your health utilization rate in your 30s and 40s when your kids are under 13 or so, and expect it will continue at that same rate from there! The previous year we met the deductible and out of pocket for my husband’s spinal fusion for accumulated wear and tear from climbing, biking, etc. (he’s in his 50s). So CAT health coverage is a gamble, and the advantage is going to go to the house at some point!
One last piece about short-term plans: you can now keep a short-term plan for a year and renew them twice. In effect, that means short-term plans can now last three years. These extensions from previous regulations gives short-term plans a more even playing with regular health insurance. However, beware of short-term plan limitations before deciding on one of those plans. 
In context of global population aging, with increasing numbers of older adults at greater risk of chronic non-communicable diseases, rapidly increasing demand for primary care services is expected in both developed and developing countries.[11][12] The World Health Organization attributes the provision of essential primary care as an integral component of an inclusive primary health care strategy.[6]

Given the premium increases  ahead for 2019, it’s essential for anyone who is eligible for premium tax credits – or who might be eligible with an income fluctuation later in the year – to enroll through the exchange if and when they have a special enrollment period. Don’t sign up for an off-exchange plan and miss out on the possibility of much more affordable premiums via a tax credit.
×