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Sepsis, a syndrome characterized by systemic inflammation during infection, continues to be one of the most common causes of patient mortality in hospitals across the United States. While standardized treatment protocols have been implemented, a wide variability in clinical outcomes persists across racial groups. Specifically, black and Hispanic populations are frequently associated with higher rates of morbidity and mortality in sepsis compared to the white population. While this is often attributed to systemic bias against minority groups, a growing body of literature has found patient, community, and hospital-based factors to be driving racial differences. In this article, we provide a focused review on some of the factors driving racial disparities in sepsis. We also suggest potential interventions aimed at reducing health disparities in the prevention, early identification, and clinical management of sepsis. Full article
If something unexpected happens to you – like a car accident or a serious illness – hospital expenses can quickly rack up. Individual health insurance can help prevent staggering expenses if you face a medical emergency. Major medical insurance is a type of coverage that provides benefits for a broad range of health-care services, both inpatient and outpatient. This health insurance can save you money on routine doctor's visits, prescription drug coverage, preventative care and other medical services. The plan will typically come with costs such as a monthly premium, an annual deductible, copayments, and coinsurance.
In 2018, it was easier for states to finalize premiums well in advance of open enrollment. In the summer/fall of 2017, it was more challenging, due to the uncertainty surrounding funding for cost-sharing reductions (CSR). President Trump had threatened throughout 2017 to eliminate federal funding for CSR, and ultimately did so on October 12, less than three weeks before the start of open enrollment.
Humana group dental plans are offered by Humana Insurance Company, HumanaDental Insurance Company, Humana Insurance Company of New York, Humana Health Benefit Plan of Louisiana, The Dental Concern, Inc., Humana Medical Plan of Utah, CompBenefits Company, CompBenefits Insurance Company, CompBenefits Dental, Inc., Humana Employers Health Plan of Georgia, Inc., or DentiCare, Inc. (DBA CompBenefits).
Telemedicine enables health professionals to provide services to you remotely, at lower costs, if you don't require physical contact with a doctor or nurse. Instead of coming into an office, you can communicate with doctors and nurses online. Doctors can help and diagnose far more patients this way, which is why purchasing a plan through eHealth that covers telemedicine may be more convenient and affordable.
A high deductible health insurance plan has higher deductibles and lower premiums than most other health insurance plans. This means you pay a smaller fixed amount every month, but it will take a longer time for insurance to kick in and begin cost-sharing (meaning you will pay your percentage of coinsurance for every bill). You might benefit from this plan if you don’t require many doctor’s visits or other healthcare benefits. Look at quotes for high deductible health insurance plans to figure out if this plan is right for you.
Non-invasive ventilation (NIV) is frequently used as a treatment for acute hypercapnic respiratory failure (AHRF) in hospitalised patients with acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (AECOPD). In the UK, many patients with AHRF secondary to AECOPD are treated with ward-based NIV, rather than being treated in critical care. NIV has been increasingly used as an alternative to invasive ventilation and as a ceiling of treatment in patients with a ‘do not intubate’ order. This narrative review describes the evidence base for ward-based NIV in the context of AECOPD and summarises current practice and clinical outcomes in the UK. Full article
Lifetime Health Cover: If a person has not taken out private hospital cover by 1 July after their 31st birthday, then when (and if) they do so after this time, their premiums must include a loading of 2% per annum for each year they were without hospital cover. Thus, a person taking out private cover for the first time at age 40 will pay a 20 percent loading. The loading is removed after 10 years of continuous hospital cover. The loading applies only to premiums for hospital cover, not to ancillary (extras) cover.
News Flash: The health insurance landscape has changed. Individuals who once could buy health insurance whenever they wanted are now forced to act like traditional company employees, and only enroll in a health insurance plan during an annual open enrollment period. However, life can throw curve balls, and leave an individual without health insurance outside…

We’re still on my wife’s employer plan so 2018 will be fine. We’ll need to figure out healthcare once she retires, though. I think the best option for us would be a regular plan. We are relatively healthy, but we go to the doctor a few times every year. The catastrophic plan would be a better fit for someone with no chronic condition at all. Healthcare is a mess here in the US.

Background: Aim of study was to assess impact of deformable registration of diagnostic MRI to planning CT upon gross tumour volume (GTV) delineation of oropharyngeal carcinoma in routine practice. Methods: 22 consecutive patients with oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma treated with definitive (chemo)radiotherapy between 2015 and 2016, for whom primary GTV delineation had been performed by a single radiation oncologist using deformable registration of diagnostic MRI to planning CT, were identified. Separate GTVs were delineated as part of routine clinical practice (all diagnostic imaging available side-by-side for each delineation) using: CT (GTVCT), MRI (GTVMR), and CT and MRI (GTVCTMR). Volumetric and positional metric analyses were undertaken using contour comparison metrics (Dice conformity index, centre of gravity distance, mean distance to conformity). Results: Median GTV volumes were 13.7 cm3 (range 3.5–41.7), 15.9 cm3 (range 1.6–38.3), 19.9 cm3 (range 5.5–44.5) for GTVCT, GTVMR and GTVCTMR respectively. There was no significant difference in GTVCT and GTVMR volumes; GTVCTMR was found to be significantly larger than both GTVMR and GTVCT. Based on positional metrics, GTVCT and GTVMR were the least similar (mean Dice similarity coefficient (DSC) 0.71, 0.84, 0.82 for GTVCT–GTVMR, GTVCTMR–GTVCT and GTVCTMR–GTVMR respectively). Conclusions: These data suggest a complementary role of MRI to CT to reduce the risk of geographical misses, although they highlight the potential for larger target volumes and hence toxicity. Full article

Can anyone address the elephant in the room: as medical therapeutics change and biologics are available and more appropriate for various conditions it is noteworthy to realize that these costs are often not covered by many government insurers and not eligible for foundations grants (as are sometimes offered in the form of copay cards, or copay assistance). I’m talking 20% out of pocket cost for a biologic can run 1500-2000 out of pocket after insurance. If you happen to get one of these rheumatologic or immunologic diseases, Medicare is NOT going to cut it. Are people folding in these possibilities into their projected costs in retirement. How does the FIRE community think about these things (I mean the medical FIRE community…I don’t think the non-medical FIRE community is even aware of these nuances unless they’re already dealing with a chronic or rare disease under treatment).
Regarding the first demographic, this represents primarily folks living in the 19 states that didn’t expand Medicaid under Obamacare. There is now a gap between Medicaid eligibility and where the exchange subsidies kick in. There are nearly 2.5 million people who fall into this gap and generally elect to not buy any health insurance or opt for the cheap catastrophic plans.

ageing, menopause and puberty; AIDS/HIV; allergies or allergic disorders; birth control, conception, sexual problems and sex changes; chronic conditions; complications from excluded or restricted conditions/ treatment; convalescence, rehabilitation and general nursing care ; cosmetic, reconstructive or weight loss treatment; deafness; dental/oral treatment (such as fillings, gum disease, jaw shrinkage, etc); dialysis; drugs and dressings for out-patient or take-home use† ; experimental drugs and treatment; eyesight; HRT and bone densitometry; learning difficulties, behavioural and developmental problems; overseas treatment and repatriation; physical aids and devices; pre-existing or special conditions; pregnancy and childbirth; screening and preventive treatment; sleep problems and disorders; speech disorders; temporary relief of symptoms.[40] († = except in exceptional circumstances)
Background: Craniosynostoses are congenital defects in the construction of the skull involving premature fusion of one or more cranial sutures. Premature fusion of sutures causes characteristic skull deformation(s). This affect the structure and thus the appearance of the entire head and face. The aim of this study was to analyze parents’ subjective assessments of head and facial appearance in children with craniosynostoses before and after surgery. Parents also assessed the interpersonal relationship of their children with peers and adults (after surgery). Methods: This study was conducted among parents of 230 children treated in Poland, in two multidisciplinary centers. Detailed statistical analysis was conducted among children who had undergone surgery. Independent variables were age (at survey) of the child (three years and less, four years, and five years and more) and type of craniosynostosis (isolated and syndromic). A chi-square independence test was used. Data was collected using surveys. Results: In the opinion of most parents, the appearance of their child’s head and face after surgery did not differ or differed only slightly from that of their peers. The results of subjective assessment of appearance of children’s face and head after reconstructive treatment remains comparable in three subgroups of patients according to the age. It seems that specific head shape according to the type of craniosynostosis does not have an impact on relations with peers and adults. Conclusion: Surgical treatment of children with craniosynostoses improves the appearance of their head and face. This improvement seems not to depend on the type of isolated craniosynostosis, and is constant over time. Full article
From an entire population perspective, the individual market risk pool is harmed when healthy people are given a lower-cost alternative. Short-term plans are generally only available to healthy people because they can simply reject applicants based on medical history. Association health plans cannot reject applicants or charge them higher prices based on medical history, but the plans can be designed in a way that they don't really appeal to people with pre-existing conditions.
Deductible: The amount that the insured must pay out-of-pocket before the health insurer pays its share. For example, policy-holders might have to pay a $500 deductible per year, before any of their health care is covered by the health insurer. It may take several doctor's visits or prescription refills before the insured person reaches the deductible and the insurance company starts to pay for care. Furthermore, most policies do not apply co-pays for doctor's visits or prescriptions against your deductible.
ATRIO Health Plans has PPO and HMO D-SNP plans with a Medicare contract and a contract with the Oregon Health Plan. Enrollment in ATRIO Health Plans depends on contract renewal. This information is not a complete description of benefits. Call 1-877-672-8620, TTY 1-800-735-2900 for more information. Out-of-network/non-contracted providers are under no obligation to treat ATRIO Health Plan members, except in emergency situations. For a decision about whether we will cover an out-of-network service, we encourage you or your provider to ask us for a pre-service organization determination before you receive the service. Please call our customer service number or see your Evidence of Coverage for more information, including the cost-sharing that applies to out-of-network services.
We present a precision medical perspective to assist in the definition, diagnosis, and management of Post Treatment Lyme Disease Syndrome (PTLDS)/chronic Lyme disease. PTLDS represents a small subset of patients treated for an erythema migrans (EM) rash with persistent or recurrent symptoms and functional decline. The larger population with chronic Lyme disease is less understood and well defined. Multiple Systemic Infectious Disease Syndrome (MSIDS) is a multifactorial model for treating chronic disease(s), which identifies up to 16 overlapping sources of inflammation and their downstream effects. A patient symptom survey and a retrospective chart review of 200 patients was therefore performed on those patients with chronic Lyme disease/PTLDS to identify those variables on the MSIDS model with the greatest potential effect on regaining health. Results indicate that dapsone combination therapy decreased the severity of eight major Lyme symptoms, and multiple sources of inflammation (other infections, immune dysfunction, autoimmunity, food allergies/sensitivities, leaky gut, mineral deficiencies, environmental toxins with detoxification problems, and sleep disorders) along with downstream effects of inflammation may all affect chronic symptomatology. In part two of our observational study and review paper, we postulate that the use of this model can represent an important and needed paradigm shift in the diagnosis and treatment of chronic disease. Full article
Deductible: The amount that the insured must pay out-of-pocket before the health insurer pays its share. For example, policy-holders might have to pay a $500 deductible per year, before any of their health care is covered by the health insurer. It may take several doctor's visits or prescription refills before the insured person reaches the deductible and the insurance company starts to pay for care. Furthermore, most policies do not apply co-pays for doctor's visits or prescriptions against your deductible.
But if you’re uninsured, it’s important to understand that you could have to wait up to two months from the time you enroll until the time your new plan takes effect. If you’re in that situation and fairly healthy, a short-term plan can bridge the gap for you. Short-term plans are available in nearly every state, and the coverage can take effect as soon as the day after you purchase your plan. So if you’re enrolling in an ACA-compliant plan on November 1, you can also enroll in a short-term plan on the same day. Your short-term plan will cover you until the end of the year, providing peace of mind just in case you end up with an unexpected emergency between now and then (you can click on your state on this map to see how short-term plans are regulated and which options are available to you).
The Select PPO may be paired with a health care Flexible Spending Account (FSA) that can be used for qualified medical expenses during the plan year. During Open Enrollment, the employee chooses an amount to contribute in 2019 and then makes voluntary pre-tax contributions up to annual IRS limits. The funds in a health care Flexible Spending Account do not roll over from year to year; if funds are not used, they are forfeited. Vanderbilt does not contribute to health care FSA accounts.
Without digging into the nuances of Medicare Part D, I believe there are out of pocket maxes (similar to out of pocket maxes in commercial insurance plans). But you are right, these are not insignificant sums (~$5k – $10K). This is most definitely on my mind when it comes to retiring early and why I, not unlike PoF, am looking to “FatFIRE” to ensure I have plenty of cushion to cover these out of pocket maxes if I were to need to do so annually. This could come from my “retirement cushion”, cut back on vacay, or I may choose to do a little part-time work to help cover costs if something came up. Thanks for raising this important point and consideration!

ATRIO Health Plans has PPO and HMO D-SNP plans with a Medicare contract and a contract with the Oregon Health Plan. Enrollment in ATRIO Health Plans depends on contract renewal. This information is not a complete description of benefits. Call 1-877-672-8620, TTY 1-800-735-2900 for more information. Out-of-network/non-contracted providers are under no obligation to treat ATRIO Health Plan members, except in emergency situations. For a decision about whether we will cover an out-of-network service, we encourage you or your provider to ask us for a pre-service organization determination before you receive the service. Please call our customer service number or see your Evidence of Coverage for more information, including the cost-sharing that applies to out-of-network services.
Humana group dental plans are offered by Humana Insurance Company, HumanaDental Insurance Company, Humana Insurance Company of New York, Humana Health Benefit Plan of Louisiana, The Dental Concern, Inc., Humana Medical Plan of Utah, CompBenefits Company, CompBenefits Insurance Company, CompBenefits Dental, Inc., Humana Employers Health Plan of Georgia, Inc ., or DentiCare, Inc. (DBA CompBenefits).
Insurer profitability in the individual market started to become much more widespread in 2017 and 2018. And although profitability is obviously the desired goal for insurance companies, they're not allowed to be too profitable. If their total administrative costs (including all overhead expenses plus profits) exceed 20 percent of the premiums they collect, they have to send rebate checks to their members. This is a provision in the ACA that ensures that health plans spend the majority of our premiums on medical costs, rather than administrative costs and profits.
Many consumers face unaffordable premiums – perhaps because they’re in the coverage gap or because their incomes make them ineligible for subsidies. Even consumers planning to buy an ACA-compliant plan during open enrollment may have to wait up to two months for the new plan to take effect. If they’re currently uninsured, a short-term plan can bridge that gap.
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