Can anyone address the elephant in the room: as medical therapeutics change and biologics are available and more appropriate for various conditions it is noteworthy to realize that these costs are often not covered by many government insurers and not eligible for foundations grants (as are sometimes offered in the form of copay cards, or copay assistance). I’m talking 20% out of pocket cost for a biologic can run 1500-2000 out of pocket after insurance. If you happen to get one of these rheumatologic or immunologic diseases, Medicare is NOT going to cut it. Are people folding in these possibilities into their projected costs in retirement. How does the FIRE community think about these things (I mean the medical FIRE community…I don’t think the non-medical FIRE community is even aware of these nuances unless they’re already dealing with a chronic or rare disease under treatment).
A high deductible health insurance plan has higher deductibles and lower premiums than most other health insurance plans. This means you pay a smaller fixed amount every month, but it will take a longer time for insurance to kick in and begin cost-sharing (meaning you will pay your percentage of coinsurance for every bill). You might benefit from this plan if you don’t require many doctor’s visits or other healthcare benefits. Look at quotes for high deductible health insurance plans to figure out if this plan is right for you.
Nice discussion, Green Swan. One concern I have for young early retirees is that medical conditions accumulate as you and your family age. So, in the case of our host, PoF, in his early 40’s, he might be currently well served by a catastrophic plan. Ten years, fifteen years, from now, he and his wife might have some medical baggage that needs medication or maintenance, and the cat plan may not serve him well.
The new CMS rules, titled in true Trump fashion, “Final 2019 Payment Notice Rule To Increase Access To Affordable Health Plans For Americans Suffering From High Obamacare Premiums,” could potentially save you from paying a tax penalty this year. The new rule provides exemptions to residents living in counties where no health insurance companies offer coverage, or only one insurer offers coverage. The rule also states that those living in counties where the only available health insurance plans cover abortion can also be exempt from a tax penalty for 2018 if it goes against their religious beliefs.
Given the premium increases  ahead for 2019, it’s essential for anyone who is eligible for premium tax credits – or who might be eligible with an income fluctuation later in the year – to enroll through the exchange if and when they have a special enrollment period. Don’t sign up for an off-exchange plan and miss out on the possibility of much more affordable premiums via a tax credit.
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