Clinical EFT (Emotional Freedom Techniques) is an evidence-based method that combines acupressure with elements drawn from cognitive and exposure therapies. The approach has been validated in more than 100 clinical trials. Its efficacy for post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) has been investigated in a variety of demographic groups including war veterans, victims of sexual violence, the spouses of PTSD sufferers, motor accident survivors, prisoners, hospital patients, adolescents, and survivors of natural and human-caused disasters. Meta-analyses of EFT for anxiety, depression, and PTSD indicate treatment effects that exceed those of both psychopharmacology and conventional psychotherapy. Studies of EFT in the treatment of PTSD show that (a) time frames for successful treatment generally range from four to 10 sessions; (b) group therapy sessions are effective; (c) comorbid conditions such as anxiety and depression improve simultaneously; (d) the risk of adverse events is low; (e) treatment produces physiological as well as psychological improvements; (f) patient gains persist over time; (g) the approach is cost-effective; (h) biomarkers such as stress hormones and genes are regulated; and (i) the method can be adapted to online and telemedicine applications. This paper recommends guidelines for the use of EFT in treating PTSD derived from the literature and a detailed practitioner survey. It has been reviewed by the major institutions providing training or supporting research in the method. The guidelines recommend a stepped-care model, with five treatment sessions for subclinical PTSD, 10 sessions for PTSD, and escalation to intensive psychotherapy or psychopharmacology or both for nonresponsive patients and those with developmental trauma. Group therapy, social support, apps, and online and telemedicine methods also contribute to a successful treatment plan. Full article
Beginning in 2019, there will be some wild changes. Early Congressional Budget Office (CBO) estimates are that health insurance premiums will rise an extra 10% and four million fewer people will buy insurance. Who will continue to buy? In all likelihood, the exchanges will represent a place for low income and sick people (e.g. chronic illnesses, etc.).

I can’t believe I missed this post on the day it published. I guess I am a fat-fire type. (I hate this term since I hate anyone calling me FAT!). After reading this I think I should work 3 more months than planned. I told my office staff that I was going to retire on My next birthday on 7/1. I will be 61. I pay health insurance quarterly so I would have my current BCBS plan paid up through 9/17. If I worked until September I could keep the current policy and then choose a catastrophic plan for the next 3.5 years. This all sounds good to me. I was expecting to pay $20000 minimum for a bronze ACA plan. They should be releasing details later this year.
The Commonwealth Fund completed its thirteenth annual health policy survey in 2010.[8] A study of the survey "found significant differences in access, cost burdens, and problems with health insurance that are associated with insurance design".[8] Of the countries surveyed, the results indicated that people in the United States had more out-of-pocket expenses, more disputes with insurance companies than other countries, and more insurance payments denied; paperwork was also higher although Germany had similarly high levels of paperwork.[8]
For starters, the vast majority of the headlines you're seeing are for health insurance that people buy in the individual market. That can be in the health insurance exchange or outside the exchange (i.e., purchased directly from the health insurance company), but it does not include coverage that people get from an employer, nor does it include Medicare, Medicaid, or the Children's Health Insurance Program.

Out-of-pocket maxima: Similar to coverage limits, except that in this case, the insured person's payment obligation ends when they reach the out-of-pocket maximum, and health insurance pays all further covered costs. Out-of-pocket maxima can be limited to a specific benefit category (such as prescription drugs) or can apply to all coverage provided during a specific benefit year.


Then the choice is clear: You need an ACA plan. ACA plans are the only option that will cover all pre-existing conditions on day 1 without waiting periods. Same with prescriptions. If you have lots of prescriptions you need coverage for then an ACA plan is your best option. Most alternative healthcare options will give you discounts on prescriptions but will not give you a “copay” structure like ACA plans—although many ACA plans do subject you to your plan deductible first. Some ACA alternatives will cover pre-existing conditions after a 12-24 month waiting period.
The status of the individual mandate was very much in question. Even if the ACA repeal bills weren't successful, insurers didn't know if the IRS would continue to enforce the mandate. And even if they did, there was uncertainty over whether the public would perceive that the mandate wasn't being enforced, which could lead to fewer healthy people purchasing coverage.
The quantity and quality of many health care interventions are improved through the results of science, such as advanced through the medical model of health which focuses on the eradication of illness through diagnosis and effective treatment. Many important advances have been made through health research, biomedical research and pharmaceutical research, which form the basis for evidence-based medicine and evidence-based practice in health care delivery.
The Affordable Care Act has delivered health insurance for millions who were unable to find affordable coverage on the individual market in the past. And, while we strongly encourage our readers to take advantage of the comprehensive ACA-compliant coverage, we do recognize that there is a segment of the individual market population that is facing daunting rate increases. We realize that their coverage options may be limited.
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