Serving Maryland, the District of Columbia and portions of Virginia, CareFirst BlueCross BlueShield is the shared business name of CareFirst of Maryland, Inc. and Group Hospitalization and Medical Services, Inc. In the District of Columbia and Maryland, CareFirst MedPlus is the business name of First Care, Inc. In Virginia, CareFirst MedPlus is the business name of First Care, Inc. of Maryland (Used in VA By: First Care, Inc.). First Care, Inc., CareFirst of Maryland, Inc., Group Hospitalization and Medical Services, Inc., CareFirst BlueChoice, Inc. and The Dental Network are independent licensees of the Blue Cross and Blue Shield Association. The Blue Cross and Blue Shield Names and Symbols are registered trademarks of the Blue Cross and Blue Shield Association.
All products require separate applications. Separate policies or certificates are issued. Golden Rule Short Term Medical plans are medically underwritten. Related insurance products offered by either company may be medically underwritten – see the product brochures and applications. HealthiestYou by Teladoc® is not insurance and is not associated with any other insurance product for which you are applying. HealthiestYou by Teladoc ® and UnitedHealthcare are not affiliated and each entity is responsible for its own contractual and financial obligations. Travel Health Insurance, Property & Casualty, Final Expense Whole Life Insurance and Pet Insurance are underwritten by different companies that are not related to the UnitedHealthcare family of companies. Product availability varies by state.
Short-term policies offer limited benefits compared with policies on the Affordable Care Act health insurance marketplaces offered by each state. They don’t include maternity care, substance abuse, and mental health, and can charge more at the outset for people with pre-existing conditions. But, on the whole, they cost less than comprehensive policies without a subsidy. A 35-year-old could purchase a short-term policy with a $5,000 deductible and $500,000 in total available benefits for about $100 a month.
Where you live in Pennsylvania and your income will determine the best cheap health insurance plan available. Pennsylvania expanded Medicaid under the Affordable Care Act, so if your household income is up to 138% of the Federal Poverty Level, you'll qualify for this coverage in the state. For those that don't qualify for Medicaid, your best health insurance options will typically be through the state marketplace, particularly if you have a low household income. Many households can qualify for tax subsidies to help lower the cost of health insurance coverage for an exchange plan.
Qualified Health Plans (QHPs) are low cost health insurance plans available to individuals younger than 65 years of age. Eligibility is determined by your income level. When you’re enrolled you’ll receive help paying your monthly health insurance by Health Insurance Premiums with Tax Credits (HIPTC). These tax credits are used to decrease your monthly payment for your health insurance premium or you can receive your tax credit as a lump sum within your federal tax return. Qualified Health Plans (with or without HIPTC) can be purchased through the Washington Health Plan Finder. There are more than 80 different plans to choose from.
When you purchase a health insurance plan in Pennsylvania, you can also add your spouse and children to the policy, which will increase your premiums with each person covered. The cost of coverage for spouses and children over the age of 14 is determined by the age of the person being insured. Children ages 14 and younger can be added to your health insurance plan for a cheaper, flat rate.

According to the Kaiser Family Foundation’s 2017 report, the average monthly premium for a single individual (without a spouse and kids) is $558. The average premium for people who qualify for health insurance under the Affordable Care Act, which means you’re getting subsidies and/or tax credits, is around $89 a month (about 85 percent of Americans are eligible for subsidies). But let’s say that you’re not eligible for subsidies or tax credits. Your average monthly payment would be $440, according to eHealth.com, so you’d still come out ahead.
Check with your state regulator that an agent has a valid license and a clean record, and make sure health insurance isn’t a sideline or a new specialty. You want an agent who represents a number of major insurers, rather than just one company. You also may want to ask agents how they’re compensated. Agents get commissions from insurers for each policy they sell, often calculated as a percentage of a customer’s premiums. These can range from around 3% to as high as 20%, according to agents and insurance officials. You want to know if your agent will make more money from selling you a certain plan. Also, commissions can be higher in the first year of a policy, an incentive for unscrupulous agents to “churn” clients, or try to get them to switch policies.
If you’re shopping through your state marketplace, know that catastrophic plans aren’t eligible for subsidies that apply to other marketplace plans. If you’re eligible for subsidies, the savings can make up most of the cost difference between catastrophic plans and high-deductible bronze plans, sometimes making bronze or even silver more affordable because of better coverage. (In case it helps in your decision making, most people don’t choose catastrophic coverage; less than 1% of people enrolled in the health insurance exchange select it.)

SB10 – This bill was introduced in 2015 and was signed into law by Gov. Brown in June 2016. It would have allowed undocumented immigrants to purchase unsubsidized coverage in the exchange, but the state needed a waiver from HHS in order to implement the law (the ACA does not allow undocumented immigrants to purchase coverage in any state’s exchange, even if they pay full price). California submitted a waiver proposal to HHS, but ultimately withdrew the waiver two days prior to President Trump’s inauguration. California State Senator Ricardo Lara (D, Bell Gardens) had introduced and championed SB10, but he requested that the waiver proposal be withdrawn (and Gov. Brown agreed) because the state was concerned that the Trump Administration could use information from the exchange to deport undocumented immigrants.


Humana group dental plans are offered by Humana Insurance Company, HumanaDental Insurance Company, Humana Insurance Company of New York, Humana Health Benefit Plan of Louisiana, The Dental Concern, Inc., Humana Medical Plan of Utah, CompBenefits Company, CompBenefits Insurance Company, CompBenefits Dental, Inc., Humana Employers Health Plan of Georgia, Inc., or DentiCare, Inc. (DBA CompBenefits).

An agent should help guide you toward the insurer most likely to accept you. Keep in mind that if you are rejected by one carrier, you will probably have to disclose that in future applications. An agent also should help you fill out the application. But make sure that you know what’s in the application and that it is accurate. If you make mistakes, you may give the insurer an opening to rescind your policy later.

Healthcare.gov will show the health insurance options available in your state along with the premiums and how much (if any) federal subsidies you could receive. The number of choices you have available will depend on where you live. Assuming enough insurers participated in your state, you'll be able to choose between bronze, silver, gold, and platinum plans. 
Short-term or temporary health insurance plans, which generally last for three months but can be renewed, are likely your cheapest option of all. How cheap? On eHealthInsurance, they’re advertising plans for as little as $75 a month. I found short-term plans for myself on eHealthInsurance for as little as $77.80 per month. But before you get too excited, keep reading.
Short-term or temporary health insurance plans, which generally last for three months but can be renewed, are likely your cheapest option of all. How cheap? On eHealthInsurance, they’re advertising plans for as little as $75 a month. I found short-term plans for myself on eHealthInsurance for as little as $77.80 per month. But before you get too excited, keep reading.
Perhaps the easiest step of all is to go to the Healthcare.gov website and complete an application. It's easy, that is, if you're doing so during an open enrollment period (the next one starts on Nov. 1) or if you have a qualifying life change. These life changes include getting married, having a baby, or losing other coverage. The website, by the way, will help you find out if you have had a life change that qualifies. 

Health insurance special enrollment periods typically last for 60 days after the date of your qualifying event. During this time, you can shop for health insurance on a private or public exchange. You’ll have the same plan options as you would during open enrollment, like copay plans, Health Savings Account (HSA)-compatible plans and a Young Adult plan. You may also have choices for dental plans and vision plans.
The chart above reflects both major medical (Obamacare) and short-term (non-Obamacare) health insurance plans based on the data on our platform. Prices vary by age, geographic area, and other factors, so please continue on our site for a personalized quote of what is available for your specific circumstances. Not all plans within a state are available in all areas of the state or to all residents in that state.
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