With the help of an insurance agent or broker. Agents generally work for a single health insurance company. Brokers generally sell plans from a number of companies. They can help you compare plans based on features and price and complete your enrollment. You don’t pay more by using an agent or broker. They’re generally paid by the insurance company whose plans they sell.
There’s another scenario where you might be able to get coverage if you missed the open enrollment period. You may qualify for a Special Enrollment Period. This happens after certain life events such as losing health coverage, moving, getting married, having a baby or adopting a child. But if this happens, you’ll need to apply within 60 days of that event, otherwise you’ll have to wait until the next open enrollment period.
eHealth is a free service, with an A+ rating from the Better Business Bureau, providing easy-to-use-and-understand plan finders and comparison tools. Plans sold through eHealth won't cost more than if you buy directly from one of our providers. eHealth will recommend plans that are best suited to your needs and budget, whether it's during the annual open enrollment period or if you have a qualifying life event. In certain states, eHealth can even help you apply for the Affordable Care Act tax credit offered by the government. eHealth is proudly invested in helping you with all your medical insurance questions and concerns, including:
According to the Kaiser Family Foundation’s 2017 report, the average monthly premium for a single individual (without a spouse and kids) is $558. The average premium for people who qualify for health insurance under the Affordable Care Act, which means you’re getting subsidies and/or tax credits, is around $89 a month (about 85 percent of Americans are eligible for subsidies). But let’s say that you’re not eligible for subsidies or tax credits. Your average monthly payment would be $440, according to eHealth.com, so you’d still come out ahead.
Health insurance can be expensive, but before you decide to go without, take a careful look at the risks. For instance, according to WebMD, there’s a 1 in 5 chance you will land in the ER at some point between the ages of 25 and 44, a trip that could cost you as much as $1,450 a pop. If you need surgery on a broken arm, you could be on the hook for more than $16,000 if you’re without insurance.
The Consolidated Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act, better known as COBRA, lets you stay on your employer’s insurance plan for up to 18 months when you would otherwise lose coverage, typically because you were laid off. But it’s also a very costly way to stay insured. Again, instead of sharing your health insurance costs with your employer, you’re paying for the entire plan.
Regular eye exams are important to you and your family's health, and they can help detect health problems and other conditions, like diabetes and glaucoma. Our affordable vision plan provides coverage for exams and eyewear or contact lenses.  Like our dental plans, you can buy a stand-alone vision plan, or you can add vision coverage to a Medical Mutual individual health insurance plan.

As we mentioned, if you’re considering getting coverage under the ACA, act fast: You must enroll by Dec. 15 if you want to get covered starting Jan. 1. If you miss that deadline, you won’t be able to enroll for the rest of the year unless you meet special criteria — such as having a baby, getting married, or losing other qualifying health insurance.

Though costs, coverage, and other particulars may differ from state to state, all states have Medicaid programs to provide coverage to a variety of people, including those with lower incomes, people with disabilities, the elderly, pregnant women, families, and children.   CHIP was created to cover children in families that do not meet Medicaid income requirements.  In some states, pregnant women can be covered under CHIP.
If something unexpected happens to you – like a car accident or a serious illness – hospital expenses can quickly rack up. Individual health insurance can help prevent staggering expenses if you face a medical emergency. Major medical insurance is a type of coverage that provides benefits for a broad range of health-care services, both inpatient and outpatient. This health insurance can save you money on routine doctor's visits, prescription drug coverage, preventative care and other medical services. The plan will typically come with costs such as a monthly premium, an annual deductible, copayments, and coinsurance.
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