According to the Kaiser Family Foundation’s 2017 report, the average monthly premium for a single individual (without a spouse and kids) is $558. The average premium for people who qualify for health insurance under the Affordable Care Act, which means you’re getting subsidies and/or tax credits, is around $89 a month (about 85 percent of Americans are eligible for subsidies). But let’s say that you’re not eligible for subsidies or tax credits. Your average monthly payment would be $440, according to eHealth.com, so you’d still come out ahead.
Short-term policies offer limited benefits compared with policies on the Affordable Care Act health insurance marketplaces offered by each state. They don’t include maternity care, substance abuse, and mental health, and can charge more at the outset for people with pre-existing conditions. But, on the whole, they cost less than comprehensive policies without a subsidy. A 35-year-old could purchase a short-term policy with a $5,000 deductible and $500,000 in total available benefits for about $100 a month.
Medicare/Medicaid – Medicare and Medicaid are both federal entitlement programs that are jointly funded by the states and federal government and is managed by the states.  It is available for low-income parents, children, seniors, and people with disabilities.  To be eligible you have to be a United States Citizen and meet eligibility requirements that are not only dependent on your income but on your assets as well. 
There’s another scenario where you might be able to get coverage if you missed the open enrollment period. You may qualify for a Special Enrollment Period. This happens after certain life events such as losing health coverage, moving, getting married, having a baby or adopting a child. But if this happens, you’ll need to apply within 60 days of that event, otherwise you’ll have to wait until the next open enrollment period.

One more tip: Consider opening a health savings account (HSA) if you go with a high-deductible plan, which are often called high deductible health plans (HDHP). You can sock away money in an HSA completely tax-free to help you pay for health care. Individuals can contribute up to $3,500 in 2019 as long as they are enrolled in a health care plan with a deductible of at least $1,350.

SB4 – The California Senate passed SB4 in early June 2015, the Assembly in September, and on October 9, 2015, Gov. Brown signed it into law. The legislation, renamed the Health for All Kids Act, focuses on Medi-Cal access for undocumented immigrant children under the age of 19. SBF will take effect in May 2016, and it has been estimated that 170,000 undocumented immigrant children will then become eligible for Medi-Cal based on their household income alone.
Health insurance costs vary in many ways. Deductibles, premiums, and copayments all play into what your health insurance costs will come out to. eHealth studies have shown that in 2018 the average individual premium was $393 without any subsidies. By comparing quotes, and speaking with a licensed agent, you might be able to find prices significantly lower than this, that still meet your needs. Taking the time to shop around and compare can make a huge difference in what you’re paying for your health insurance.
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