Despite the headlines about the ACA being ruled unconstitutional, it’s important to understand that this case is far from over and could eventually make its way to the Supreme Court. Shortly after the ruling was announced, CMS Administrator Seema Verma tweeted that “the exchanges are still open for business” and that “there is no impact to current coverage or coverage in a 2019 plan.”
From the onset of the financial crisis to lingering high unemployment rates, many Ohioans have lost their health insurance in recent years. Indeed, long-term unemployment, one of the primary reasons people lose their health insurance coverage, is at record levels, according to this report from the Plain Dealer's Olivera Perkins. Although the state's health insurance industry is, arguably, ill-equipped to handle the pivot to swelling ranks of residents who must now shop for health insurance on the individual market, finding an affordable Ohio health insurance quote is not the lost cause many assume it to be. Take a look at this information that will provide a glimpse into the current state of health care in Ohio, as well as specific tips about finding affordable coverage through NetQuote.

If you get a job and are offered a job-based health plan you should tell the Marketplace as soon as possible. You can cancel your Marketplace plan or keep it. But you may not be able to get lower costs based on your income. This will depend on whether the job-based plan is considered affordable and meets certain minimum value standards. If you enroll in the job-based plan, you can’t get any savings on Marketplace insurance.


Gold plans are best for high expected costs: Consumers with higher expected medical care needs, especially those who have routine prescription needs, should tailor their choices toward higher coverage. This can include the Gold-tiered plans, which come with a higher premium but also reduce your out-of-pocket expenses should you need medical care. Gold plans will have much lower copays, coinsurance and deductibles, meaning each additional visit to a provider will be cheaper than a lower-tier plan. It is especially important to consider the copays and coinsurance for prescription medication, as this is typically the one area of plan benefits that has highest routine use.

Under the Affordable Care Act, 34 states and Washington, D.C., expanded Medicaid eligibility to many low-income adults, including adults without dependent children.  Three other states (Idaho, Nebraska, and Utah) will vote by ballot initiative on the Medicaid expansion this November, while 14 other states have chosen not to expand Medicaid under the law. In states that expanded Medicaid, you may qualify for Medicaid if you earn $16,753 a year as a single individual or $28,676 for a family of three, while other family sizes can qualify at higher incomes. In states that did not expand, non-disabled adults who are parents with very low income will qualify (the eligibility levels vary by state). Regardless of your state’s decision on expanding Medicaid, children are eligible for Medicaid or the Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP) if their family  income is about $40,000 (for a family of three), or more in some states. If you live in a state that did not expand Medicaid and you cannot find affordable coverage, you could be exempt from paying a penalty for not having coverage.
A high deductible health insurance plan has higher deductibles and lower premiums than most other health insurance plans. This means you pay a smaller fixed amount every month, but it will take a longer time for insurance to kick in and begin cost-sharing (meaning you will pay your percentage of coinsurance for every bill). You might benefit from this plan if you don’t require many doctor’s visits or other healthcare benefits. Look at quotes for high deductible health insurance plans to figure out if this plan is right for you.
Out-of-network/non-contracted providers are under no obligation to treat Humana members, except in emergency situations. For a decision about whether we will cover an out-of-network service, we encourage you or your provider to ask us for a pre-service organization determination before you receive the service. Please call our customer service number or see your Evidence of Coverage for more information, including the cost-sharing that applies to out-of-network services.
An independent health insurance agent may be able to help you find low cost health insurance coverage for you and your family that you can afford, especially if no one in your family has anything that is considered high risk to insure.  They also know of professional groups and organizations that membership can get you into a group plan that you may be easier to be accepted onto if anyone in your family has major health issues. 
State Children’s Health Insurance Programs (SCHIP) – This program is in place to try and provide coverage for every uninsured child in the United States where they have proper health care.  Just because you are not eligible for insurance through Medicare or Medicaid does not mean that your children will not be eligible for either Medicare, Medicaid, or the Children’s Health Insurance Program of the state you live in.
Whatever your stance on health care reform, there’s no denying that the ACA has given the uninsured a new option. The ACA, the legislation behind the new health insurance exchanges, aims to make affordable health insurance available to everyone regardless of pre-existing conditions that traditionally make plans too expensive (or keep them out of reach entirely). It also prohibits insurers from dropping you because you get sick, and puts an end to lifetime and yearly plan limits for essential care.
Silver plans are best for the average or low-income consumer: Silver health plans are a good middle ground for most consumers since they balance out-of-pocket costs and monthly premium payments. Silver plans also have a huge advantage for low-income households. Silver plans are the only plans that come with a cost-sharing reduction variation, which allows lower-income households to benefit from copays, deductibles and coinsurance much lower than a standard plan. For households with incomes less than 250% of the federal poverty level, a Silver plan is almost always the best option. These will offer lower premiums than Gold plans, and their cost sharing will be adjusted to match more expensive options.

What if you're anticipating a significant change in medical expenses? Simply adjust your calculations to reflect your best guess as to what your medical costs might be over the coming year. Even if you don't expect a big change, it can be quite useful to perform some "what if" scenarios to evaluate the impact of much higher or much lower medical expenses than you've had in the past.
The Kaiser Family Foundation web site is a good place to start in researching your eligibility for various government programs or, if you are losing coverage because of a layoff, continuing workplace benefits through the federal law known as Cobra. Once Cobra coverage runs out, insurers may be required under federal law to sell you another policy, though there’s no guarantee on the price. But different states implement this rule in different ways.
The Affordable Care Act (ACA) has made it easier for more people to get health insurance. If you don’t have health coverage through your employer, there are several ways to shop for health insurance. Health coverage can be purchased from an agent, an insurance company or the Health Insurance Marketplace. You may also qualify for Medicaid or Medicare.
Medicaid may be available to immigrants who have been legally residing in the United States for five years or more if they meet eligibility requirements. Medicaid isn’t usually available to undocumented immigrants, although there may be exceptions such as short-term limited Medicaid coverage in emergency situations, and emergency coverage for pregnant women.
For a chosen tier of coverage, your age will directly impact the premiums you pay for health insurance. A 40-year-old would pay 28% more for health coverage than a 21-year-old would pay, which would translate to an additional $92 per month for a Bronze plan but $123 more for a Gold plan in Texas. However, that 40-year-old would pay 53% cheaper rates than what a 60-year-old would pay for the same coverage.
With the help of an insurance agent or broker. Agents generally work for a single health insurance company. Brokers generally sell plans from a number of companies. They can help you compare plans based on features and price and complete your enrollment. You don’t pay more by using an agent or broker. They’re generally paid by the insurance company whose plans they sell.
Louise Norris is an individual health insurance broker who has been writing about health insurance and health reform since 2006. She has written dozens of opinions and educational pieces about the Affordable Care Act for healthinsurance.org. Her state health exchange updates are regularly cited by media who cover health reform and by other health insurance experts.

The insurers and health insurance plans available on the Pennsylvania Health Insurance Marketplace will vary depending on the county you live in. To help you get started finding the best cheap health insurance policy, we identified the cheapest Silver plan in each county in the state. Below, you can see sample monthly premiums for each of the plans based on your family size.


Prices are fixed by law, so you will not find better prices for the same plan anywhere else. But comparing your options might help you find low-cost health insurance. You can shop around online and use free quotes from eHealth to find providers that offer high-quality, low-cost individual and family health insurance plans. Seeing all your options could make finding low-cost health insurance easier.
×