Check with your state regulator that an agent has a valid license and a clean record, and make sure health insurance isn’t a sideline or a new specialty. You want an agent who represents a number of major insurers, rather than just one company. You also may want to ask agents how they’re compensated. Agents get commissions from insurers for each policy they sell, often calculated as a percentage of a customer’s premiums. These can range from around 3% to as high as 20%, according to agents and insurance officials. You want to know if your agent will make more money from selling you a certain plan. Also, commissions can be higher in the first year of a policy, an incentive for unscrupulous agents to “churn” clients, or try to get them to switch policies.
Additionally, short-term health insurance plans don’t have to follow all of the Affordable Care Act’s rules. For example, a short-term health insurance policy can place a cap on benefits, limiting the insurer’s potential losses if you become seriously (and expensively) ill while you’re covered. Short-term health insurance doesn’t have to cover all of the essential health benefits. For example, it might not cover maternity care or birth control.
To get the subsidy, you must apply for it and purchase a plan through your state’s health insurance exchange, also known as the Health Insurance Marketplace. The amount you receive will depend on the estimated household income that you put on your Marketplace application. Usually, you must make between 100 and 400 percent of the federal poverty level to qualify.
The health care industry is slow to advance technologically, and the limitations of many legacy systems lead payers to spend time and money fixing inaccurate payments. The claims payment process needs to be more efficient. Fortunately, there are health care IT solutions to address these issues. Advancements in interoperability, integrated ecosystems, and business intelligence allow efficient and accurate payments – the first time.
You may want to consult the HHS Health Resources Services Administration (HRSA) directory of health centers at http://findahealthcenter.hrsa.gov/ - these health centers provide care on a sliding fee scale so it is affordable for anyone. You can receive care even if you are uninsured or cannot pay. Search the directory by zip code to find the centers nearest you.
You probably picked up on this when we talked about catastrophic health insurance, but don’t only look at the monthly premium when you’re trying to figure out what plan you want. You need to look at co-pays, the amount of money you’ll pay when you go to a routine doctor’s visit. What’s the most you’ll spend in a year (the annual out-of-pocket maximum) if you end up using your health insurance a lot?
The Affordable Care Act (ACA) has made it easier for more people to get health insurance. If you don’t have health coverage through your employer, there are several ways to shop for health insurance. Health coverage can be purchased from an agent, an insurance company or the Health Insurance Marketplace. You may also qualify for Medicaid or Medicare.
The cheapest purchase you'll ever make is the one you don't make. It's entirely possible that you don't have to buy individual health insurance at all. Depending on which state you live in and what your income is, you might qualify for Medicaid. You can contact your nearest Medicaid office, or go to Healthcare.gov to determine if you're eligible (see step three below for the latter route).

If your parent has job-based health insurance and his or her employer subsidizes family premiums, your health insurance premiums will be paid in part by your parent’s employer. The rest of the monthly premium will be taken out of your parent’s paycheck. If your parent’s employer doesn’t subsidize family coverage, your entire monthly premium will be deducted from your parent’s paycheck.


Lower-tier plans, such as Bronze and Catastrophic plans, have lower monthly premiums, but your total expenses will be much higher if you need medical care due to the high cost-sharing features. Therefore, these plans may be the best cheap option for young and healthy shoppers that have low expected medical needs and enough savings to cover the high deductibles, copays and coinsurance if necessary. But keep in mind that Catastrophic plans aren't available for everyone—you'll only qualify for these policies if you're under the age of 30 or meet certain exemptions.
This guide will help compare differences between ACA compliant plans and Non-ACA plans. Non-ACA plans can save you a great deal of money and offer greater access to providers. Having said that, Non-ACA plans aren’t for everyone. If you have significant health issues and very specific needs you may need to stay in an ACA plan. Keep reading for more information.
SB4 – The California Senate passed SB4 in early June 2015, the Assembly in September, and on October 9, 2015, Gov. Brown signed it into law. The legislation, renamed the Health for All Kids Act, focuses on Medi-Cal access for undocumented immigrant children under the age of 19. SBF will take effect in May 2016, and it has been estimated that 170,000 undocumented immigrant children will then become eligible for Medi-Cal based on their household income alone.

Incidentally, when the Affordable Care Act was originally passed, you had to pay a penalty tax for going without health coverage unless you met certain exemption criteria, including financial hardship. But going forward, in 2019, there will be no fee if you don’t have health insurance. (If you were uninsured in 2018, you will be penalized on your 2018 tax form for that.)
There’s the Preferred Provider Organization, a PPO, and a Health Maintenance Organization plan, an HMO. There’s also an Exclusive Provider Organization (EPO) and a Point-of-Service Plan (POS) as well as a Catastrophic Plan, which we’ve covered. What’s the difference? Well, in a nutshell, PPOs tend to have more flexibility in what doctor and hospital you can see (and get your insurance to pay for), and HMOs lack that flexibility (you can only see certain doctors and hospitals within your insurer’s network).
Prior to the ACA’s reforms in the individual health insurance market, medical history was a factor in eligibility for private plans in nearly every state, including California. Applicants with pre-existing conditions were often unable to buy individual plans in the private market, or if coverage was available it came with a higher premium or with exclusions on pre-existing conditions.
eHealthInsurance is the nation's leading online source of health insurance. eHealthInsurance offers thousands of health plans underwritten by more than 180 of the nation's health insurance companies, including Aetna and Blue Cross Blue Shield. Compare plans side by side, get health insurance quotes, apply online and find affordable health insurance today.
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