From the onset of the financial crisis to lingering high unemployment rates, many Ohioans have lost their health insurance in recent years. Indeed, long-term unemployment, one of the primary reasons people lose their health insurance coverage, is at record levels, according to this report from the Plain Dealer's Olivera Perkins. Although the state's health insurance industry is, arguably, ill-equipped to handle the pivot to swelling ranks of residents who must now shop for health insurance on the individual market, finding an affordable Ohio health insurance quote is not the lost cause many assume it to be. Take a look at this information that will provide a glimpse into the current state of health care in Ohio, as well as specific tips about finding affordable coverage through NetQuote.
Some consumers choose plans based solely on online research. But without guidance, it can be tough to fully understand the nuances of a plan and how it compares to other options. First, make sure you’re actually buying insurance, not some other product such as a discount card – one key way to tell is by checking with your state regulator that the company selling the product is considered a legitimate insurer. Be very careful about limited products such as temporary insurance, which last for a set period of time, since you may not be able to renew such a plan at the end of that period.
State Children’s Health Insurance Programs (SCHIP) – This program is in place to try and provide coverage for every uninsured child in the United States where they have proper health care.  Just because you are not eligible for insurance through Medicare or Medicaid does not mean that your children will not be eligible for either Medicare, Medicaid, or the Children’s Health Insurance Program of the state you live in.

Where you live in Pennsylvania and your income will determine the best cheap health insurance plan available. Pennsylvania expanded Medicaid under the Affordable Care Act, so if your household income is up to 138% of the Federal Poverty Level, you'll qualify for this coverage in the state. For those that don't qualify for Medicaid, your best health insurance options will typically be through the state marketplace, particularly if you have a low household income. Many households can qualify for tax subsidies to help lower the cost of health insurance coverage for an exchange plan.
If you are going to buy your own insurance, start your research with Web sites that explain the basics, such as healthinsuranceinfo.net, sponsored by the Georgetown University Health Policy Institute, and healthcarecoach.com, from the nonprofit National Health Law Program. They will help you understand the concepts and language of health insurance, which aren’t always easy to grasp, and should give you some sense of the questions to ask about any plan. Healthinsurance.org has useful information, but be aware that the site also provides insurance quotes from what it calls “carefully chosen partners who are in the business of selling health insurance.”

The Medicaid program is now called Washington Apple Health. Children’s Medicaid is called Apple Health for Kids and the adult program is called Apple Health for Adults. Washington Apple Health provides coverage for income eligible adults, pregnant women and children. Eligibility is determined by your income level and household size. For example, an individual would qualify for Medicaid if they are age 19 to 65 and their annual income was less than $16,644, with higher limits for families with children. If your income is higher, you may still be eligible for a Qualified Health Plan.

Our short-term health insurance plans can help you bridge the gap in your healthcare coverage for up to three months when you're going through a transition. Short-term plans can save you money, but they aren't compliant with the Affordable Care Act and they don't have coverage requirements. Pre-existing conditions aren't covered and you will be subject to medical questions and Underwriting approval.
Advertising Disclosure: TheSimpleDollar.com has an advertising relationship with some of the offers included on this page. However, the rankings and listings of our reviews, tools and all other content are based on objective analysis. The Simple Dollar does not include all card/financial services companies or all card/financial services offers available in the marketplace. For more information and a complete list of our advertising partners, please check out our full Advertising Disclosure. TheSimpleDollar.com strives to keep its information accurate and up to date. The information in our reviews could be different from what you find when visiting a financial institution, service provider or a specific product's website. All products are presented without warranty.
Choose a health insurance plan that works for you. All Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Texas health plans follow the Affordable Care Act guidelines. They have the same essential health benefits, quality, and amount of care. Where health plans differ are in how the benefits are applied and how much they cost. For example, some plans might have lower premiums and higher deductibles; others have higher premiums and lower deductibles. Learn more.

Humana group medical plans are offered by Humana Medical Plan, Inc., Humana Employers Health Plan of Georgia, Inc., Humana Health Plan, Inc., Humana Health Benefit Plan of Louisiana, Inc., Humana Health Plan of Ohio, Inc., Humana Health Plans of Puerto Rico, Inc. License # 00235-0008, Humana Wisconsin Health Organization Insurance Corporation, or Humana Health Plan of Texas, Inc., or insured by Humana Health Insurance Company of Florida, Inc., Humana Health Plan, Inc., Humana Health Benefit Plan of Louisiana, Inc., Humana Insurance Company, Humana Insurance Company of Kentucky, or Humana Insurance of Puerto Rico, Inc. License # 00187-0009, or administered by Humana Insurance Company or Humana Health Plan, Inc. For Arizona residents, plans are offered by Humana Health Plan, Inc. or insured by Humana Insurance Company. Administered by Humana Insurance Company.


Internet/Wi-Fi connection is needed for computer access. Data charges may apply. Check your cellular data or internet service provider’s plan for details. Non-emergency medical service in Idaho, Montana and New Mexico is limited to interactive audio/video (video only), along with the ability to prescribe. Non-emergency medical service in Arkansas is limited to interactive audio/video (video only) for initial consultation, along with the ability to prescribe. Behavioral Health service is limited to interactive audio/video (video only), along with the ability to prescribe in all states. Service availability depends on location at the time of consultation.
Bronze and Catastrophic plans are best for the young and healthy: At the cheapest end of the premium spectrum are the Bronze and Catastrophic plans. These plans, while cheap in terms of premiums, come with high out-of-pocket costs, often with deductibles and out-of-pocket maximums near the highest allowable by law. In 2019, this is $7,900 for an individual and $15,800 for a household. Consumers might find the lower premiums very appealing, but keep in mind these plans will generally offer nothing until you've paid thousands of dollars in expenses first. This could be problematic if you don't have any disposable savings should you find yourself in need of moderate medical care. In such cases, you would effectively pay for the costs yourself. The Bronze and Catastrophic plans really help out in cases of significant emergencies where care will cost tens or hundreds of thousands of dollars.
The Medicaid program is now called Washington Apple Health. Children’s Medicaid is called Apple Health for Kids and the adult program is called Apple Health for Adults. Washington Apple Health provides coverage for income eligible adults, pregnant women and children. Eligibility is determined by your income level and household size. For example, an individual would qualify for Medicaid if they are age 19 to 65 and their annual income was less than $16,644, with higher limits for families with children. If your income is higher, you may still be eligible for a Qualified Health Plan.
You may want to consult the HHS Health Resources Services Administration (HRSA) directory of health centers at http://findahealthcenter.hrsa.gov/ - these health centers provide care on a sliding fee scale so it is affordable for anyone. You can receive care even if you are uninsured or cannot pay. Search the directory by zip code to find the centers nearest you.

Medicaid works slightly differently in each state, but to be eligible, you must meet low-income guidelines. In many states, you’ll qualify for Medicaid if your income is 138 percent of federal poverty level or less. However, some states have stricter eligibility criteria. In those states, you must meet low-income guidelines and also be a member of a medically vulnerable group such as a pregnant woman, an elderly person, blind, disabled, or a child.

This depends on you and your present health condition. We encourage you to visit iHealthAgents GoodRx Prescription Tool and review your own prescriptions to see if you can save any money. While STM plans typically don’t cover prescriptions (some actually do), for most healthy individuals this isn’t a concern. I personally take an expensive name brand prescription that costs me $300 a month even with GoodRx, however, that said, I’m saving $1,100 a month by choosing STM over an ACA plan so for me it still makes perfect sense.
You probably picked up on this when we talked about catastrophic health insurance, but don’t only look at the monthly premium when you’re trying to figure out what plan you want. You need to look at co-pays, the amount of money you’ll pay when you go to a routine doctor’s visit. What’s the most you’ll spend in a year (the annual out-of-pocket maximum) if you end up using your health insurance a lot?
There’s the Preferred Provider Organization, a PPO, and a Health Maintenance Organization plan, an HMO. There’s also an Exclusive Provider Organization (EPO) and a Point-of-Service Plan (POS) as well as a Catastrophic Plan, which we’ve covered. What’s the difference? Well, in a nutshell, PPOs tend to have more flexibility in what doctor and hospital you can see (and get your insurance to pay for), and HMOs lack that flexibility (you can only see certain doctors and hospitals within your insurer’s network).
We are certified as “in-person assisters” by the Washington State Health Benefit Exchange. Regardless of your financial situation, we are here to guide you through the system and help you understand and apply for health insurance. Visit our online Benefit Finder or call the WithinReach Family Health Hotline at 1-800-322-2588 today to get started. Or, read on to learn more about health insurance.
For costs, benefits, exclusions, limitations, eligibility, and renewal terms, call a licensed Product Advisor to discuss your health insurance options. 1 UnitedHealthcare received the highest numerical score in the proprietary J.D. Power 2013-2015, 2017-2018 (tied in 2018) Vision Plan Satisfaction Reports. Report measures opinions of consumers with vision plans. Visit www.jdpower.com/awards 2 Short-term health insurance is medically underwritten and does not cover preexisting conditions. This coverage is not required to comply with certain federal market requirements for health insurance, principally those contained in the Affordable Care Act. Be sure to check your policy carefully to make sure you are aware of any exclusions or limitations regarding coverage of preexisting conditions or health benefits (such as hospitalization, emergency services, maternity care, preventive care, prescription drugs, and mental health and substance use disorder services). Your policy might also have lifetime and/or annual dollar limits on health benefits. If this coverage expires or you lose eligibility for this coverage, you might have to wait until an open enrollment period to get other health insurance coverage. This coverage is not “minimum essential coverage.” 3 The coverage term is one day less than 3 years. This coverage is not required to comply with certain federal market requirements for health insurance, principally those contained in the Affordable Care Act. Be sure to check your policy carefully to make sure you are aware of any exclusions or limitations regarding coverage of preexisting conditions or health benefits (such as hospitalization, emergency services, maternity care, preventive care, prescription drugs, and mental health and substance use disorder services). Your policy might also have lifetime and/or annual dollar limits on health benefits. If this coverage expires or you lose eligibility for this coverage, you might have to wait until an open enrollment period to get other health insurance coverage. 4 National Association of Dental Plans. Who has dental benefits? Retrieved from http://www.nadp.org/Dental_Benefits_Basics/Dental_BB_1.aspx#_ftn1 5 This is a supplement to health insurance and is not a substitute for the minimum essential coverage required by the Affordable Care Act (ACA). Lack of major medical coverage (or other minimum essential coverage) may result in an additional payment with your taxes. 6 Underwritten by Sirius International Insurance Corporation or United States Fire Insurance Company. 7 Optional benefits require an additional premium cost. Products vary by state.
The Affordable Care Act (ACA) has made it easier for more people to get health insurance. If you don’t have health coverage through your employer, there are several ways to shop for health insurance. Health coverage can be purchased from an agent, an insurance company or the Health Insurance Marketplace. You may also qualify for Medicaid or Medicare.

If something unexpected happens to you – like a car accident or a serious illness – hospital expenses can quickly rack up. Individual health insurance can help prevent staggering expenses if you face a medical emergency. Major medical insurance is a type of coverage that provides benefits for a broad range of health-care services, both inpatient and outpatient. This health insurance can save you money on routine doctor's visits, prescription drug coverage, preventative care and other medical services. The plan will typically come with costs such as a monthly premium, an annual deductible, copayments, and coinsurance.
×