Medicaid is paid for by federal and state taxes. If you get Medicaid, your friends, neighbors, and fellow citizens are paying for your health care with their tax dollars. Although Medicaid is government health insurance, the vast majority of care provided to Medicaid recipients is provided by private businesses and health care providers. If you get Medicaid, you’ll likely be cared for at the same hospitals and by the same physicians as your neighbors with private health insurance are.
The chart above reflects both major medical (Obamacare) and short-term (non-Obamacare) health insurance plans based on the data on our platform. Prices vary by age, geographic area, and other factors, so please continue on our site for a personalized quote of what is available for your specific circumstances. Not all plans within a state are available in all areas of the state or to all residents in that state.
If you get a job and are offered a job-based health plan you should tell the Marketplace as soon as possible. You can cancel your Marketplace plan or keep it. But you may not be able to get lower costs based on your income. This will depend on whether the job-based plan is considered affordable and meets certain minimum value standards. If you enroll in the job-based plan, you can’t get any savings on Marketplace insurance.
Lower-tier plans, such as Bronze and Catastrophic plans, have lower monthly premiums, but your total expenses will be much higher if you need medical care due to the high cost-sharing features. Therefore, these plans may be the best cheap option for young and healthy shoppers that have low expected medical needs and enough savings to cover the high deductibles, copays and coinsurance if necessary. But keep in mind that Catastrophic plans aren't available for everyone—you'll only qualify for these policies if you're under the age of 30 or meet certain exemptions.
The Kaiser Family Foundation web site is a good place to start in researching your eligibility for various government programs or, if you are losing coverage because of a layoff, continuing workplace benefits through the federal law known as Cobra. Once Cobra coverage runs out, insurers may be required under federal law to sell you another policy, though there’s no guarantee on the price. But different states implement this rule in different ways.
To get the subsidy, you must apply for it and purchase a plan through your state’s health insurance exchange, also known as the Health Insurance Marketplace. The amount you receive will depend on the estimated household income that you put on your Marketplace application. Usually, you must make between 100 and 400 percent of the federal poverty level to qualify.
Qualified Health Plans (QHPs) are low cost health insurance plans available to individuals younger than 65 years of age. Eligibility is determined by your income level. When you’re enrolled you’ll receive help paying your monthly health insurance by Health Insurance Premiums with Tax Credits (HIPTC). These tax credits are used to decrease your monthly payment for your health insurance premium or you can receive your tax credit as a lump sum within your federal tax return. Qualified Health Plans (with or without HIPTC) can be purchased through the Washington Health Plan Finder. There are more than 80 different plans to choose from.
The higher metal tier health plans, such as Gold and Platinum tiers, come with higher premiums, but significantly lower out of pocket expenses, such as deductibles, copays and coinsurance. Therefore, they're typically a more cost-effective option if you expect to have consistent or high medical expenses. For instance, people with consistent prescription needs may want to consider Gold and Platinum plans that have cheap out-of-pocket expenses for prescription drugs.
With the help of an insurance agent or broker. Agents generally work for a single health insurance company. Brokers generally sell plans from a number of companies. They can help you compare plans based on features and price and complete your enrollment. You don’t pay more by using an agent or broker. They’re generally paid by the insurance company whose plans they sell.

If you’re wondering how to get cheap health insurance, and also happen qualify for Medicaid, then this is the medical insurance plan for you. Medicaid is funded jointly by the federal and state governments. Those who are eligible will have access to the same benefits as a marketplace or private health insurance plan and still receive the same high-quality care.
The higher metal tier health plans, such as Gold and Platinum tiers, come with higher premiums, but significantly lower out of pocket expenses, such as deductibles, copays and coinsurance. Therefore, they're typically a more cost-effective option if you expect to have consistent or high medical expenses. For instance, people with consistent prescription needs may want to consider Gold and Platinum plans that have cheap out-of-pocket expenses for prescription drugs.
We compared Pennsylvania health insurance plans by metal tier in order to help you find the best cheap policy for your preferred level of coverage. The set of insurers and plans available is determined by the county you live in, so not all of the policies listed below are offered everywhere in the state. But we recommend using these as a starting point to assess the benefits you can expect for a given tier of coverage as compared to premiums and out of pocket costs.

If your spouse has job-based health insurance, you may be eligible for the same coverage. Many employers extend the offer of job-based health insurance to their employees’ spouses, children, and step-children. You must sign up for this coverage during the initial enrollment period when your spouse first gets his or her job. If you miss this opportunity, you’ll have another opportunity during each annual open enrollment period.
Qualified Health Plans (QHPs) are low cost health insurance plans available to individuals younger than 65 years of age. Eligibility is determined by your income level. When you’re enrolled you’ll receive help paying your monthly health insurance by Health Insurance Premiums with Tax Credits (HIPTC). These tax credits are used to decrease your monthly payment for your health insurance premium or you can receive your tax credit as a lump sum within your federal tax return. Qualified Health Plans (with or without HIPTC) can be purchased through the Washington Health Plan Finder. There are more than 80 different plans to choose from.
Silver plans are best for the average or low-income consumer: Silver health plans are a good middle ground for most consumers since they balance out-of-pocket costs and monthly premium payments. Silver plans also have a huge advantage for low-income households. Silver plans are the only plans that come with a cost-sharing reduction variation, which allows lower-income households to benefit from copays, deductibles and coinsurance much lower than a standard plan. For households with incomes less than 250% of the federal poverty level, a Silver plan is almost always the best option. These will offer lower premiums than Gold plans, and their cost sharing will be adjusted to match more expensive options.
If you get a job and are offered a job-based health plan you should tell the Marketplace as soon as possible. You can cancel your Marketplace plan or keep it. But you may not be able to get lower costs based on your income. This will depend on whether the job-based plan is considered affordable and meets certain minimum value standards. If you enroll in the job-based plan, you can’t get any savings on Marketplace insurance.
Now for the tough part. You need to compare the costs of each plan -- and not just the premium prices. The bronze plans will definitely have the cheapest premiums, but they only pay 60% of medical costs versus 90% for platinum plans. When businesses buy products and services, they look at something called "total cost of ownership", which includes all costs associated with the purchase. To truly find cheap health insurance, you need to take this same approach. 

By comparison, the Commonwealth Fund’s Scorecard on State Health System Performance 2015 placed California 26th, but the state jumped 12 spots, to 14th place, in the 2017 Scorecard. While the majority of the state’s health indicators had relatively middle-of-the-road placement, the state fared very well in terms of tobacco use and percentage of the population that suffered from tooth loss (2nd place in both cases). But California ranked 50th in terms of the percentage of children with a medical home.
If you get a job and are offered a job-based health plan you should tell the Marketplace as soon as possible. You can cancel your Marketplace plan or keep it. But you may not be able to get lower costs based on your income. This will depend on whether the job-based plan is considered affordable and meets certain minimum value standards. If you enroll in the job-based plan, you can’t get any savings on Marketplace insurance.
The chart above reflects both major medical (Obamacare) and short-term (non-Obamacare) health insurance plans based on the data on our platform. Prices vary by age, geographic area, and other factors, so please continue on our site for a personalized quote of what is available for your specific circumstances. Not all plans within a state are available in all areas of the state or to all residents in that state.
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