Non-ACA Plan is a very generalized term that people use to describe anything that is not compliant with the ACA. The problem is that a lot of plans that aren’t actual insurance get lumped in like faith-based cost-sharing plans which are not insurance. There are also a lot of new plans from carriers that no one has ever heard of pushing plans that sound like the greatest thing since sliced bread. None of these have passed our sniff test and as a result, the only non-ACA plan that we recommend is Short Term Medical Insurance (STM). Due to recent changes in the law, these plans are now able to be purchased for 12 months at a time.
All products require separate applications. Separate policies or certificates are issued. Golden Rule Short Term Medical plans are medically underwritten. Related insurance products offered by either company may be medically underwritten – see the product brochures and applications. HealthiestYou by Teladoc® is not insurance and is not associated with any other insurance product for which you are applying. HealthiestYou by Teladoc ® and UnitedHealthcare are not affiliated and each entity is responsible for its own contractual and financial obligations. Travel Health Insurance, Property & Casualty, Final Expense Whole Life Insurance and Pet Insurance are underwritten by different companies that are not related to the UnitedHealthcare family of companies. Product availability varies by state.
Medicaid works slightly differently in each state, but to be eligible, you must meet low-income guidelines. In many states, you’ll qualify for Medicaid if your income is 138 percent of federal poverty level or less. However, some states have stricter eligibility criteria. In those states, you must meet low-income guidelines and also be a member of a medically vulnerable group such as a pregnant woman, an elderly person, blind, disabled, or a child.
Though costs, coverage, and other particulars may differ from state to state, all states have Medicaid programs to provide coverage to a variety of people, including those with lower incomes, people with disabilities, the elderly, pregnant women, families, and children.   CHIP was created to cover children in families that do not meet Medicaid income requirements.  In some states, pregnant women can be covered under CHIP.
Low cost health insurance plans are available from Blue Cross of California, Blue Shield, Health Net, Oscar, Aetna, and Kaiser Permanente. California Health Plans specializes in providing health insurance plans for individuals, families, and small businesses. Our website offers free health insurance quotes and allows you to compare Blue Cross insurance plans, Blue Shield insurance plans, and other medical plans.
The only way to get a marketplace plan or cost assistance is through your state’s Health Insurance Marketplace.  That being said, some major brokers and providers can help you find out if you qualify for subsidizes and some can help you enroll in a marketplace plan.  So in some cases you have your choice between getting help from your state’s marketplace or from an outside broker or agent.  The benefit to choosing an agent outside the marketplace (like us) is that they can present other non-marketplace plan options too.
Perhaps the easiest step of all is to go to the Healthcare.gov website and complete an application. It's easy, that is, if you're doing so during an open enrollment period (the next one starts on Nov. 1) or if you have a qualifying life change. These life changes include getting married, having a baby, or losing other coverage. The website, by the way, will help you find out if you have had a life change that qualifies. 
One of the most popular plans through eHealth, short-term health insurance provides coverage for a fixed period of time (three months to three years). Short-term health insurance is typically 80% cheaper than most medical plans, but may have limited benefits. Short-term plans won't cover maternity leave, mental health, substance abuse, and pre-existing conditions.

This Medical Mutual of Ohio and its Family of Companies (collectively, “Medical Mutual”) website may contain links to other Internet sites (“Third Party Sites”) that are not maintained by or under the control of Medical Mutual. These links are provided solely for your convenience, and you access them at your own risk. Medical Mutual makes no warranties or representations about the contents of products, services or information offered in such Third Party Sites. Consequently, Medical Mutual is not and cannot be held responsible for the accuracy, copyright compliance, legality or decency of material contained in Third Party Sites linked to this Medical Mutual website.


HealthMarkets Insurance Agency, Inc. is licensed as an insurance agency in all 50 states and DC. Not all agents are licensed to sell all products. Service and product availability varies by state. Sales agents may be compensated based on a consumer’s enrollment in a health plan. Agent cannot provide tax or legal advice. Contact your tax or legal professional to discuss details regarding your individual business circumstances. Our quoting tool is provided for your information only. All quotes are estimates and are not final until consumer is enrolled. Medicare has neither reviewed nor endorsed this information.
Covered California consumers with Silver-tier coverage who do not receive a subsidy to help them pay their premium each month may be able to avoid certain rate increases in 2018 by switching to a different metal tier (Gold or Bronze) or shopping directly with an insurance company. Consumers in this situation are encouraged to contact an expert Certified Insurance Agent or Enrollment counselor for assistance.
State Children’s Health Insurance Programs (SCHIP) – This program is in place to try and provide coverage for every uninsured child in the United States where they have proper health care.  Just because you are not eligible for insurance through Medicare or Medicaid does not mean that your children will not be eligible for either Medicare, Medicaid, or the Children’s Health Insurance Program of the state you live in.
An independent health insurance agent may be able to help you find low cost health insurance coverage for you and your family that you can afford, especially if no one in your family has anything that is considered high risk to insure.  They also know of professional groups and organizations that membership can get you into a group plan that you may be easier to be accepted onto if anyone in your family has major health issues. 

There's one important thing to keep in mind, though -- you can only receive a federal subsidy if you go through a government exchange (Healthcare.gov or your state's exchange), licensed agents with the proper certification, or qualified online insurance marketplaces partnering with a government exchange (click here to see which online sites qualify).


Under the Affordable Care Act, 34 states and Washington, D.C., expanded Medicaid eligibility to many low-income adults, including adults without dependent children.  Three other states (Idaho, Nebraska, and Utah) will vote by ballot initiative on the Medicaid expansion this November, while 14 other states have chosen not to expand Medicaid under the law. In states that expanded Medicaid, you may qualify for Medicaid if you earn $16,753 a year as a single individual or $28,676 for a family of three, while other family sizes can qualify at higher incomes. In states that did not expand, non-disabled adults who are parents with very low income will qualify (the eligibility levels vary by state). Regardless of your state’s decision on expanding Medicaid, children are eligible for Medicaid or the Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP) if their family  income is about $40,000 (for a family of three), or more in some states. If you live in a state that did not expand Medicaid and you cannot find affordable coverage, you could be exempt from paying a penalty for not having coverage.

You can buy a short-term health insurance policy directly from a health insurance company, use your own insurance agent, find a health insurance agent or broker at the National Association of Health Underwriters website, or use a non-governmental private online exchange such as ehealthinsurance.com. However, short-term health insurance is not sold on Affordable Care Act health insurance exchanges such as HealthCare.gov.
We are certified as “in-person assisters” by the Washington State Health Benefit Exchange. Regardless of your financial situation, we are here to guide you through the system and help you understand and apply for health insurance. Visit our online Benefit Finder or call the WithinReach Family Health Hotline at 1-800-322-2588 today to get started. Or, read on to learn more about health insurance.
A health care sharing ministry is an organization that facilitates sharing of health care costs among individual and families who have common ethical or religious beliefs. A health care sharing ministry is not actual insurance, is not regulated by the Department of Insurance, does not use actuaries, does not accept the risk or make guarantees, and does not purchase reinsurance policies on behalf of its members.
You can only qualify for Catastrophic health plans if you're under 30 years old or meet certain exemption requirements, although Bronze plans are available to anyone. These lower metal tier policies have cheap monthly premiums for health insurance, but much higher cost sharing. So, if you need medical care during the year, you would have to pay more money out of pocket before coverage kicks in. For instance, the Cigna Connect 7150 Bronze plan has a deductible of $7,350, whereas some Gold plans have a deductible below $1,000. If you can cover the high cost sharing in the event of an emergency and expect to have low medical costs, a Bronze plan may be your best cheap option for health insurance coverage.
These plans are significantly cheaper than most medical insurance plans, but there are some stipulations. The first being that they don’t cover preventive services and the second is they don’t cover medical services that are considered unbiblical. For example, your birth control and abortion would not be covered if you are enrolled in a Medishare plan.
According to the Kaiser Family Foundation’s 2017 report, the average monthly premium for a single individual (without a spouse and kids) is $558. The average premium for people who qualify for health insurance under the Affordable Care Act, which means you’re getting subsidies and/or tax credits, is around $89 a month (about 85 percent of Americans are eligible for subsidies). But let’s say that you’re not eligible for subsidies or tax credits. Your average monthly payment would be $440, according to eHealth.com, so you’d still come out ahead.

Covered California consumers with Silver-tier coverage who do not receive a subsidy to help them pay their premium each month may be able to avoid certain rate increases in 2018 by switching to a different metal tier (Gold or Bronze) or shopping directly with an insurance company. Consumers in this situation are encouraged to contact an expert Certified Insurance Agent or Enrollment counselor for assistance.

Short-term health insurance frequently costs less than comprehensive health insurance. For this reason, it’s an attractive option to some people looking for temporary coverage. Short-term plans are available for up to six months of coverage. They cannot be renewed. In some states, you may buy another 6-month short-term policy immediately after your first one expires, essentially giving you one year of coverage. In other states, you’re not allowed to buy back-to-back short-term health insurance plans, so you’ll be limited to a maximum of six months of coverage.​
California residents voted on two healthcare-related propositions in November 2016: Proposition 61, The California Drug Price Relief Act, did not pass (it would have prohibited state agencies from paying more for any prescription drug than the lowest price the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs pays for the same drug). But Proposition 56 passed, increasing the per-pack cigarette tax from $0.87 to $2.87; a majority of revenues are slated to fund health care for low-income Californians.

Also, watch out for benefit limits, including annual and lifetime maximum payouts. So-called “mini-med” policies that cap their payouts can be dangerous, since you might end up paying bills for thousands of dollars if you have a major illness or surgery. Certain plans pay only a set fee per day of a hospital stay, which could leave you on the hook for thousands of dollars. Drug benefits don’t always include every medication. Some policies exclude maternity coverage, or don’t include care for pre-existing conditions.
SB4 – The California Senate passed SB4 in early June 2015, the Assembly in September, and on October 9, 2015, Gov. Brown signed it into law. The legislation, renamed the Health for All Kids Act, focuses on Medi-Cal access for undocumented immigrant children under the age of 19. SBF will take effect in May 2016, and it has been estimated that 170,000 undocumented immigrant children will then become eligible for Medi-Cal based on their household income alone.
If you get a job and are offered a job-based health plan you should tell the Marketplace as soon as possible. You can cancel your Marketplace plan or keep it. But you may not be able to get lower costs based on your income. This will depend on whether the job-based plan is considered affordable and meets certain minimum value standards. If you enroll in the job-based plan, you can’t get any savings on Marketplace insurance.

Supplemental coverage is not real medical insurance. In essence, you are giving up most of your benefits, and in return, you get a low monthly premium. Supplemental coverage only pays out a lump sum of cash for a qualifying medical expense, so you can forget about benefits like preventive care. It’s not recommended to have supplemental insurance as your only source of coverage, but if it’s your last resort, some coverage is better than none.
Short-term policies offer limited benefits compared with policies on the Affordable Care Act health insurance marketplaces offered by each state. They don’t include maternity care, substance abuse, and mental health, and can charge more at the outset for people with pre-existing conditions. But, on the whole, they cost less than comprehensive policies without a subsidy. A 35-year-old could purchase a short-term policy with a $5,000 deductible and $500,000 in total available benefits for about $100 a month.
HealthMarkets Insurance Agency, Inc. is licensed as an insurance agency in all 50 states and DC. Not all agents are licensed to sell all products. Service and product availability varies by state. Sales agents may be compensated based on a consumer’s enrollment in a health plan. Agent cannot provide tax or legal advice. Contact your tax or legal professional to discuss details regarding your individual business circumstances. Our quoting tool is provided for your information only. All quotes are estimates and are not final until consumer is enrolled. Medicare has neither reviewed nor endorsed this information.
Silver plans are best for the average or low-income consumer: Silver health plans are a good middle ground for most consumers since they balance out-of-pocket costs and monthly premium payments. Silver plans also have a huge advantage for low-income households. Silver plans are the only plans that come with a cost-sharing reduction variation, which allows lower-income households to benefit from copays, deductibles and coinsurance much lower than a standard plan. For households with incomes less than 250% of the federal poverty level, a Silver plan is almost always the best option. These will offer lower premiums than Gold plans, and their cost sharing will be adjusted to match more expensive options.

Individual and family medical and dental insurance plans are insured by Cigna Health and Life Insurance Company (CHLIC), Cigna HealthCare of Arizona, Inc., Cigna HealthCare of Illinois, Inc., and Cigna HealthCare of North Carolina, Inc. Group health insurance and health benefit plans are insured or administered by CHLIC, Connecticut General Life Insurance Company (CGLIC), or their affiliates (see a listing of the legal entities that insure or administer group HMO, dental HMO, and other products or services in your state). Group Universal Life (GUL) insurance plans are insured by CGLIC. Life (other than GUL), accident, critical illness, hospital indemnity, and disability plans are insured or administered by Life Insurance Company of North America, except in NY, where insured plans are offered by Cigna Life Insurance Company of New York (New York, NY). All insurance policies and group benefit plans contain exclusions and limitations. For availability, costs and complete details of coverage, contact a licensed agent or Cigna sales representative. This website is not intended for residents of New Mexico.
×